2017-2018 Literature – American Culture

8/4/17

August 18 –
The Last Crusader – pp. 1-56
August 25- This will appear to be a great deal of writing but the selections are not long. Focus on one pastor or poet each day.
Read:  http://www.ligonier.org/learn/articles/why-you-should-read-puritans/
John Winthrop ( 1588-1649) Puritan
Sermon (1630) – “A Model of Christian Charity”

Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) Puritan http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/bradstreet/bradstreet.html
* The Author to her book
* Before the Birth of One of Her Children
* By Night When Others Soundly Slept
* The Flesh and the Spirit
* In Reference to her Children
* To My Dear and Loving Husband

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) Puritan – will send to you.

Sermon (1741) – “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”
Sermon extract (1752) – “Divine Light”
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rI5qCFksA7Y&feature=youtu.be – an audio version of “Sinners…”
John Newton (1725-1807) Anglican- will send to you.
*The World
*Praise for the Incarnation
*Saturday Evening
*Prayers Answered by Crosses

September 1-
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin – read pp. 1-93. (Stopping at “Thus far written at Passy 1784.”)
September 8
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin – read pp. 94-171, and pp.222-234 in the back of the book –“ A Miscellany of Franklin’s Opinions” (continued on next page)
After you finish the autobiography itself, read the introduction (pp. vii-xix) and be prepared to discuss the issues he raises. Pay particular attention to the idea of multiple “Franklins” introduced on pp. xii-xiii.
Read “Excerpt from Essays to do Good” by Cotton Mather – will send to you.
Read Romans 9:25- 10:13 and use the text to compare and contrast Ben’s and Cotton’s attempts and motives to do good as compared to the scripture. DO NOT SKIP THIS PORTION
A point to consider… was the Autobiography a “rags to riches” story or was it a self-serving egotistical story of a man’s self-absorption?” Be able to support your opinion with passages from Franklin’s writings.
September 15- Will get these to you; focus on one poet each day.
Phyllis Wheatley
*On Being Brought to America from Africa
*On the Death of Mr. George Whitfield
*On Imagination
*To the University of Cambridge in New England
*An Hymn to the Evening

Phillip Freneau

*On the Death of Mr. Benjamin Franklin
* On a Honey Bee
* The Indian Burying Ground

William Cullen Bryant.
*Thanatopsis
*To Cole, the Painter, Departing for Europe
*To a Waterfowl
*A Forest Hymn
Thomas Cole – is a painter closely associated with the literature we are studying. You’ve read Bryant’s poem about Cole, and Cole did several paintings based on The Last of the Mohicans, which we will be reading next.
Read Cole’s “Essay on American Scenery” Consider the similarities between Cole’s and Bryant’s thinking. See if you can catch the allusion to James Fenimore Cooper in Cole’s essay. (continued next >)
Read an introduction to Cole’s life and artwork, and view examples of his artwork; both of which I will send.

September 22
The Last of the Mohicans – chapters 1-13 (pp. 11-133)
September 29
The Last of the Mohicans – chapters 14-25 (pp.134-266)
October 6
The Last of the Mohicans- chapters 26-33 (pp. 267-350)
October 13 – Fall break
October 20
Edgar Allan Poe – will send to you.
Stories:
“The Fall of the House of Usher”
“The Tell Tale Heart”
“The Purloined Letter”
“The Cask of Amontillado”

Poems:

“Sonnet- to Science”
“To Helen”
“Annabel Lee”
“The Bells”
“The Sleeper”

Essay:

“The Philosophy of Composition” ( Read this after you read “The Raven”)

Note: Poe helped establish the genre of detective stories. “The Purloined Letter” alludes to two of his other detective stories, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Mystery of Marie Roget.” Rue Morgue is pretty gory ( contrasted with “The Purloined Letter”); I have not read either, but if you do not mind a little gore, it might be interesting to read these other two stories as well. Entirely optional. You should be able to find them online.

October 27
The Scarlet Letter – the preface, “The Custom-House – Introductory,” and chapters 1-10 ( pp. 5-121)
November 3
The Scarlet Letter – chs. 11-24
November 10
Nathaniel Hawthorne – short stories: will send to you.
“Roger Malvin’s Burial”(1843)
“Young Goodman Brown” (1835)
“The Minister’s Black Veil” (1837)
“ The Birthmark” (1843)
“The Artist of the Beautiful” (1844)

November 17
Melville’s short story:
“Bartleby” – found in Billy Budd and Other Stories
Excerpts from Moby Dick (1851) http://www.bartleby.com/91/
*Etymology
*Extracts
*Chapter 1 – Loomings
*Chapter 19 – The Prophet
*Chapter 41 – Moby Dick
*Chapter 42 – The Whiteness of the Whale

November 24- Thanksgiving Break

December 1
Billy Budd – not the entire book – only the novella titled Billy Budd in it.
December 8
Ralph Waldo Emerson – will send to you.
“The American Scholar” (speech, 1837)
“Self – Reliance” (essay, 1841)

Henry David Thoreau

“Civil Disobedience” ( essay, 1849) found in the back of Walden.

2016-17 Literature Syllabus – Christendom

8/27/16

2016-2017 HIGH SCHOOL LITERATURE SYLLABUS – CHRISTENDOM
FALL SEMESTER
AUG 26- Confessions
SEPT 2- Confessions
SEPT 9- Confessions
SEPT 16- Confessions
SEPT 23- Beowolf
SEPT 30- Beowolf
OCT 7- Song of Roland
OCT 14- Song of Roland
OCT 21- Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
OCT 28- Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
NOV 4- Inferno
NOV 11- Inferno
NOV 18- Inferno
NOV 25- THANKSGIVING BREAK
DEC 2- Inferno
DEC 9- Inferno

2016-2017 HIGH SCHOOL LITERATURE SYLLABUS
SPRING SEMESTER
JAN 6- Canterbury Tales (selections)
JAN 13- Canterbury Tales (selections)
JAN 20- Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves
JAN 27- Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves
FEB 3- Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves
FEB 10- Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves
FEB 17- WINTER BREAK
FEB 24- Dr. Faustus
MAR 3- Dr. Faustus
MAR 10- Paradise Lost
MAR 17- SPRING BREAK
MAR 24- Paradise Lost
MAR 31- Paradise Lost
APR 7- Paradise Lost
APR 14- Pilgrim’s Progress
APR 21- Pilgrim’s Progress
APR 28- Pilgrim’s Progress
MAY 5- Pilgrim’s Progress
MAY 12- Summation

2015-16 High School Literature

8/22/15

HIGH SCHOOL LITERATURE SYLLABUS 2015-16
Aug. 28
PARENTS AND STUDENTS: Please read and discuss these first two handouts together before our first class.
• “Introduction to the Great Books” from A Guide to the Great Books by Wes Callihan, Veritas Press (handout)
• “The Devil Has No Stories” – Introduction in Heroes of the City of Man, pp. 13-38
• Read the Omnibus handout on The Epic of Gilgamesh
• Read the Stirling Bridge pages on The Epic of Gilgamesh, pp. 1-4
• Read The Epic of Gilgamesh, Introduction – p. 28
Sep. 4
• Read Epic of Gilgamesh, pp. 29- end , and bring your plot chart to class.
• Answer and be prepared to discuss the following questions in class.
1. What does Gilgamesh say about the gods?
2. What does Gilgamesh say about man?
3. What does Gilgamesh say about mortality?
4. What does Gilgamesh say about salvation?
5. What does Gilamesh say about the afterlife?
6. How does the author set Gilgamesh up to be a type of savior for the story?
7. How does Gilgamesh succeed, and how does he fail?
8. From the reading, how much do you think the early Babylonian pagans understood about the state of mankind?
9. Compare and contrast Shamash with Ishtar. What roles did they play in the epic? In what way do they both fail as Gods?
10. Compare the gods of the Babylonian pantheon with the God of Abraham. You may want to look at Genesis 12, 15, 17, and 22. How does the use of a covenant make Yahweh different from the Babylonian gods?

We will spend the next 6 weeks on The Iliad by Homer. In addition to reading The Iliad, we will read from Heroes of the City of Man for a Christian and literary perspective. Note: We are reading a different version of the book so the line numbers will not match up. If possible I will try to modify it with the correct numbers.
I have divided the reading assignments according to the sections in Heroes of the City of Man. Please follow the reading schedule as assigned, and always read the assigned sections in the book before reading in the Heroes of the City of Man.
It is VERY IMPORTANT to stay current with each week’s reading. I recommend dividing each week’s reading ( from both books) into 4 roughly equal sections for Monday-Thursday, but don’t divide a chapter of the book over 2 days. Note that there is a glossary of characters beginning on p. 573. This will be a helpful reference.
We will not do a journal this year, but I will ask you to turn in a required analysis for each book once it is finished. I will give you the complete instructions for how this is to be done. It will be a compilation of specified information, but not required to be written in essay form. Do not stress about this portion of the class!
Recommended but not required: As you read each book (chapter), write a brief outline or summary of the main plot points. Nothing detailed, just words, phrases, or sentences written to jog your memory as to the flow of the story. Think highlights. This can help you keep up with the plot as you move ahead and will also serve as a useful review later on. If alright with your parents, I encourage you to underline important information or that which seems significant to you. Circle unfamiliar words, and feel free to write notes or questions.
Sep. 11
*Read “Introduction of an Ancient Epic” in Heroes of the City of Man. Pp. 43-51.
* Read Introduction to The Iliad of Homer pp. 3-64
*Read Heroes of the City of Man, pp 85-97
*Be able to discuss the review questions and thought questions, pp. 96-97

Sep. 18
*Read The Iliad, Books 1-8
*Read Heroes, “The Rage of Achilles”
*Be able to discuss review and thought questions

Sep. 25
*Read Iliad, Books 9-13
Oct. 2
*Read Iliad, Books 14-17
*Read Heroes, “The Love of Achilles,”
*Be able to discuss the review and thought questions, pp. 124-5

Oct. 9
*Read the Iliad, Books 18-21
*Read Heroes, “Enraged Love”
*Be able to discuss the review and thought questions, pp. 133-4
Oct. 16
*Read The Iliad, Books 22-24
*Read Heroes, “The Final Feasts, “
*Be able to discuss the review and thought questions
*Turn in analysis of The Iliad

Oct. 23
*Read The Odyssey, Books 1-4
*Read Heroes, “The Image of His Father”
*Be able to discuss the review and thought questions

Oct. 30
*Read The Odyssey, Books 5-9
*Read Heroes, “Hidden Hero”
*Be able to discuss review and thought questions

Nov. 6
*Read The Odyssey, Books 10-12
*Read Heroes, “In No Man’s Land”
*Be able to discuss review and thought questions

Nov. 13
*Read The Odyssey, Books 13-17

Nov. 20
*Read The Odyssey, Books 18-22
*Read Heroes, “ His Own Did Not Receive Him
*Be able to discuss review and thought questions

Nov. 27 – Thanksgiving
Dec. 4
*Read The Odyssey, Books 23-24
*Read Heroes, “Apocalypse”
*Be able to discuss review and thought questions

Dec. 11-
*Read Heroes, “Son of Pain”
*Turn in analysis of The Odyssey

7th GRAMMAR REVISION

1/4/13

2ND SEMESTER
Jan.11 – lessons 36-37
18- lessons 38-40 test 36-40
25- lessons 41,42
FEB 1- lessons 43-45 test 41-45
8- lessons 46-47
15- lessons 48-50 test 46-50
22- lessons 51,52
MAR 1- lessons 53-55 test 51-55
8- lesson 56,57
22- lessons 58-60 test 56-60
APRIL 5- lessons61,62
April 12- lessons 63-65 test 61-65
19- lessons 66,67
26- lessons 68-70 test 66-70
MAY 3- lessons 71,72
May 10- lesson 73-75
17- test 71-75

6TH GRADE GRAMMAR REVISION

1/4/13

2ND SEMESTER
JAN 11 – CHAPTER 16
JAN18- – CHAPTER 17
JAN 25 – CHAPTER 18
FEB 8– CHAPTER 19
FEB 15 – CHAPTER 20
FEB 22 – CHAPTER 21
MAR 1 – CHAPTER 22
MAR 8 – CHAPTER 23
MAR 22 – CHAPTER 24
APR 5– CHAPTER 25
APR 12 – CHAPTER 26
APR 19 – CHAPTER 27
APR 26 – CHAPTER 28
MAY 3- CHAPTER 29
MAY 10 – RESEARCH PAPER DUE/FINAL
MAY 17 – PARTY 😀

6th grade Shirley Grammar 2012-3

9/26/12

6TH GRAMMAR 2012-13

1ST SEMESTER
AUG 24- CHAPTER 1, LESSONS 1-5
AUG 31- CHAPTER 2, LESSONS 2-5
SEPT 7- CHAPTER 3
SEPT 14- CHAPTER 4
SEPT 21- CHAPTER 5
SEPT 28- CHAPTER 6
OCT 5- CHAPTER 7
OCT 12- CHAPTER 8
OCT 19- CHAPTER 9
OCT 26- CHAPTER 10
NOV 2- CHAPTER 11
NOV 9- CHAPTER 12
NOV 16- CHAPTER 13
NOV 30- CHAPTER 14
DEC. 7- CHAPTER 15
MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!!!

2ND SEMESTER
JAN 4 – CHAPTER 16
JAN11- – CHAPTER 17
JAN 18 – CHAPTER 18
JAN 25 – CHAPTER 19
FEB 8 – CHAPTER 20
FEB 15 – CHAPTER 21
FEB 22 – CHAPTER 22
MAR 1 – CHAPTER 23
MAR 8 – CHAPTER 24
MAR 22 – CHAPTER 25
APR 5 – CHAPTER 26
APR 12 – CHAPTER 27
APR 19 – CHAPTER 28
APR 26- CHAPTER 29
MAY 3 – RESEARCH PAPER DUE/FINAL
MAY 10 – PARTY 😀

7th grade Jenson’s Grammar

9/26/12

Student assignments – Grammar 7

Aug. 24 – first class, no assignments due
31 – lessons 1, 2,3
Sept. 7 – lessons 4,5, test 1-5
14 – lessons 6,7
21 – lessons 8,9,10, test 6-10
28 – lesson 11,12
Oct. 5 – lessons 13-15 test 11-15
12 – lessons 16,17
19 – lessons 18-20 test 16-20
26 – lessons 21,22
Nov. 2 – lessons 23-25 test 21-25
9 – lessons 26-27
16 – lessons 28-30 test 26-30
30 – lessons 31,32
Dec. 7 – lessons 33-35 test 31-35

Jan. 4 – lessons 36-37
11- lessons 38-40 test 36-40
18- lessons 41,42
25- lessons 43-45 test 41-45
Feb. 1- lessons 46-47
8- lessons 48-50 test 46-50
15- lessons 51,52
22- lessons 53-55 test 51-55
Mar. 1- lesson 56,57
8- lessons 58-60 test 56-60
22- lessons61,62
April 5- lessons 63-65 test 61-65
12- lessons 66,67
19- lessons 68-70 test 66-70
26- lessons 71,72
May 3- lesson 73-75
10- test 71-75

5th and 6th grade Grammar -2nd Semester Syllabus

12/30/11

2ND SEMESTER- Home assignments (I teach lesson 1 on Fridays)
JAN 2- 6 – Review any material that needs practice- 1st semester’s vocabulary, jingles, parts of speech.
JAN 9-13 – Chapter 14 lesson 2-5
JAN 16-20 – Chapter 15 lesson 2-5
JAN 23-27 – Chapter 16 lesson 2-5
JAN 30 –FEB 3 – Chapter 17 lesson 2-5
FEB 6-10 – Chapter 18 lesson 2-5
FEB 13-17 – Chapter 19 lesson 2-5
FEB 20-24 – BREAK
FEB 27- MAR 2 – Chapter 20 lesson 2-5
MAR 5-9 – Chapter 21 lesson 2-5
MAR 12-16 SPRING BREAK
MAR 19-23 Chapter 22 lesson 2-5
MAR 26-30- Chapter 23 lesson 2-5
APR 2-6 – Chapter 24 lesson 2-5
APR 9-13 – Chapter 25 lesson 2-5
APR 16-20 – Chapter 26 lesson 2-5
APR 23-27- Chapter 27 lesson 2-5
APR 30- MAY 4 – Chapter 28 lesson 2-5
MAY 7-11 – Chapter 29 lesson 2-5, Final on Friday